Research updates

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Mimicking mergers and hyperbolic VItamins

A couple of months ago a student who I’ve been working with for the last year or so put out a new first author paper, which was an exciting moment. This is the first time I’ve had a student publish, so I’m enjoying a little buzz of excitement from that, but Weichangfeng should enjoy all the glory of getting the project finished.

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Making Gravitational Waves

This post is part of a series of quick astrophysics explainers I’m trying to put together, partly so that I can link to something when I talk about some of these things elsewhere rather than frequently repeating myself! Hopefully it shouldn’t take more than a few minutes to read, and you’ll come away knowing a little more about gravitational waves.

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GWTC-2: introducing 39 new gravitational waves

I remember as a child religiously reading the Argos catalogue; probably sometimes looking for Christmas presents, but often just looking at how many things you could possibly buy from one shop. As I got older I started to wonder how on earth they managed to put such a large catalogue together. Five years after the first detection of a gravitational wave signal, I have a little insight into just how hard the latter process is, and a little more appreciation for how much the Universe has to offer.

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Asimov v0.3.0 now available!

The latest release of asimov is now available from our gitlab server, as well as being available on pypi.

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Python packaging, configuration files, and elisp adventures

Here is another technical note, this time with some code which I keep rewritting in different projects, so I decided to put it all in one place.

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Making injections with Bilby

The last couple of days I’ve spent a fair amount of time trying organising a number of diversity-related things for our upcoming collaboration meeting, and doing more admin than I can pretend to have enjoyed, so today’s note’s going to be a fairly short one, covering some work I did while helping a student using Bilby, the LSC’s new inference library (named, pleasingly, after an animal).

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Twinkle, twinkle, big explosion

Today marks a major moment in the development of a project I’ve been working on for some time: me and my co-authors have completed a paper on inferring the opening angles of gamma ray bursts by observing binary neutron star mergers and gamma ray bursts. What does that mean? Well, I guess the point of this post is to explain just that. It should be said, while you can download the paper now, it’s still a pre-print: that means it hasn’t been peer-reviewed yet, so there’s a chance it may contain some mistakes which we’ve not picked up on. So I guess you might argue it’s probably not quite completed.

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